The new you (with new boundaries)

It’s rare to be offered an opportunity to completely reinvent yourself. Over the last few years my professional self has experimented with making changes to improve efficiency and well-being. Unfortunately, most of my changes were short-lived. It’s hard to turn over a new leaf when everyone around you still expects the old one. Generating buy-in from colleagues and supervisors can be a challenge and in almost every circumstance, I surrendered to my old habits and abandoned my plan. Starting a new degree can be an opportunity to redefine your professional image and establish balance and boundaries within a new community.

Virtual ways of working have introduced new dimensions of flexibility into the workday. Technology allows many employees and students to work from remote locations, while still maintaining collaborative relationships with colleagues. Flexibility can also promote peer collaboration on a local scale. For example you could change your cluster of neighbours depending on who you need to work with on a particular day or during a particular project. A few years ago, I had a lightbulb moment while working in this type of environment. I noticed a correlation between visibility and volume of spontaneous work requests. Being visible meant being included – a huge benefit when working on projects that require collaboration. But being included in every discussion can also be disruptive, especially when you are included because you just happen to be there rather than because you have something unique to contribute.

Technology has also contributed to a culture of immediate response. Depending on the communication tool being used, we often know when a recipient has read a message – another form of visibility. And we get impatient when we know that someone has looked at a communication, but hasn’t responded. For me, deciding how and when to respond to digital and face-to-face requests is a boundary issue. It can be hard to institute new habits when you have already established a pattern of answering emails over the weekend or giving tutorials during your lunch break.

During an impactful career counselling session I remember being asked – what does a fresh start look like? The beginning of a new academic program, perhaps at a new institution or in a new city, is an opportunity to implement your wish list. Looking back at my master’s program, I regret that I didn’t make more of an effort to become part of the graduate student community. I wish that I maintained a more organized file structure and that I spent more time writing at the front end of my program. I have a long list of items that I would change if I could do it all over again.

Leveraging these regrets is a smart way to get started with a new challenge. Will I maintain regular working hours or adopt a flexible schedule? How will I network within the Department and the greater University community? What quality of work will I turn in? How much is good enough? What type of teaching assistant do I want to be? Will I answer emails on evenings and weekends? Or reserve that time for family? What do I think I could have done better in the past to promote happiness and well-being? And it isn’t just about the negative – what did I do well that I want to repeat or prioritize?

A new graduate program will be full of new teachers, mentors, and connections who will inspire and guide you along your journey. Complement this with self-coaching. Make use of your personal experiences and take advantage of the opportunity to try a new approach. I’m standing at the beginning of a new adventure and I’m not going to miss my chance to do it all over again.

© SF Jones, 2017